M.O.V.E. – Medical Organizations supporting Vaping & Electronic cigarettes

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CALL FOR DOCTORS, HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS AND SCIENTISTS IN SUPPORT OF ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES.
 
As physicians and health professionals we see everyday patients who are severely affected by tobacco smoking, many of whom will eventually die or have their health severely affected despite our help and advice. Tobacco smoking remains the most serious public health issue in the world.
People smoke for the nicotine but die from the chemicals produced when tobacco is burned.i Unfortunately, currently available smoking cessation medications have limited efficacy and acceptability for the majority of smokers. However, we believe that there is a solution: the use of electronic cigarettes clearly has huge potential to help many smokers turn their backs on tobacco.
To this end, we strongly believe that ethically and scientifically speaking it is our responsibility to draw attention to the following:
  • It is the combustion of tobacco and the 4000 chemical substances that are produced when smoking cigarettes that are harmful to health of smokers, not the nicotine.
  • The dangers of electronic cigarettes are considerably lower than those of tobacco. From analysis of the constituents of e-cigarette vapour, e-cigarettes can be expected to be at least 95 to 99% safer than smoking tobacco cigarettes in terms of long-term health risks.ii
  • The vapour exhaled from e-cigarette users is highly unlikely to be harmful to bystanders; nicotine concentrations in exhaled vapour are too low to have pharmacological effects on bystanders.iii
  • Randomised controlled trials show that e-cigarettes are effective in smoking cessationiv and studies of the use of e-cigarettes in real world settings show that they are more effective than other means for stopping smoking including Nicotine Replacement Therapy.v
  • It is estimated that for every one million people who switch from smoking to electronic cigarettes, some 6000 premature deaths a year would be averted.vi
E-cigarettes do not ‘renormalise smoking’ – ‘vaping’ is not smoking.  In many countries the rise in e-cigarette use has been accompanied by a continued decline in tobacco sales and prevalence of smoking.vii
The characteristics of electronic cigarettes should always be compared to those of conventional cigarettes, and discussion about the absolute long-term safety of electronic cigarettes must be contrasted ethically and scientifically with the absolute certainty of the harmfulness of smoked tobacco.
Already estimated 29m consumers in Europe use e-cigarettes.viii But we believe that the individual and public health gains associated with electronic cigarette use are held back by misconceptions about the product.
In light of the numerous studies undertaken to date we – as health professionals – cannot remain passive in the face of the clear public health benefits of electronic cigarettes.
We therefore recommend that our colleagues actively learn more about electronic cigarettes as a new public health tool in the ongoing global health campaign against tobacco-related diseases.
We call on our colleagues to sign this declaration in support of the merits of electronic cigarettes based on scientific evidence and ethical debate.
Yours faithfully,
Group of professionals who support this statement.
If  you  agree  with  the  M.O.V.E  statement  please  click  on  the  image  below  to  add  your  support.

i Russell, M. A. Low-tar medium-nicotine cigarettes: a new approach to safer smoking (1976) BMJ  1 (6023) 1430-1433

ii Farsalinos, K. E., & Polosa, R. (2014). Safety evaluation and risk assessment of electronic cigarettes as tobacco cigarette substitutes: a systematic review. Therapeutic Advances in Drug Safety, 5(2), 67–86. doi:10.1177/2042098614524430

iii Hajek P, Etter J-F, Benowitz N, McRobbie H (2014) Electronic cigarettes: review of use, content, safety, effects on smokers, and potential for harm and benefit. Addiction.

iv McRobbie, H., Bullen, C., Hartmann-Boyce, J., & Hajek, P. (2014). Electronic cigarettes for smoking cessation and reduction. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 12, CD010216. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD010216.pub2

v Brown, J. et al (2014).  Real-world effectiveness of e-cigarettes when used to aid smoking cessation: a cross-sectional population study. Addiction doi:10.1111/add.12623

vi West, R. B. J. (2014). Electronic cigarettes : fact and fiction. British Journal of General Practice, (September), 442–443.doi:10.3399/bjgp14X681253

vii West R, Brown J, Beard E. Trends in electronic cigarette use in England. Smoking Toolkit Study 140122. 2014.www.smokinginengland.info/latest-statistics

viii Vardavas, C.et al (2014). Determinants and prevalence of e-cigarette use throughout the  European Union: a secondary analysis of 26 566 youth and adults from 27 Countries.  Tobacco Control, 1–7. doi:10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2013-051394

As seen here:

https://sciencecig.wordpress.com/move/

E-cigarettes may help people quit smoking regular cigarettes: study says…

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Even among study participants with no intention of quitting smoking, using e-cigs led to a decrease in traditional cigarette use or in some cases quitting regular cigs entirely, Italian researchers found in what they say is the first clinical trial to explore the use of e-cigarettes as a quitting tool.
A man smokes an e-cigarette, a device that delivers a vaporized puff of nicotine.

ROBIN UTRECHT/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

A man smokes an e-cigarette, a device that delivers a vaporized puff of nicotine.

In a trial of e-cigarettes among Italian smokers with no desire to quit using tobacco at the outset, up to 13 percent of participants were not smoking regular cigarettes at all a year later.

Though the study was not billed as a smoking-cessation test, more than half of participants cut down on tobacco soon after they started using the e-cigarettes. And the percentage who quit smoking entirely by the end rivals results achieved with medications, the authors note in the journal PLOS ONE.

“I think the main message of the study is that we can use these products as an extraordinary tobacco control tool,” Dr. Riccardo Polosa, the new study’s senior author from the University of Catania, told Reuters Health.

“This really is the first clinical trial that’s ever been reported on electronic cigarettes. There has been survey evidence and anecdotal reports, but this is the first serious study,” said Dr. Michael Siegel, who studies e-cigarettes but wasn’t involved in the new research.

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E-cigarettes were first introduced in China in 2004. The battery-powered devices let users inhale nicotine-infused vapors, which don’t contain the harmful tar and carbon monoxide in tobacco smoke.

While past studies have looked at the use of e-cigarettes, the new study is the first to follow hundreds of smokers for an entire year. It did not, however, compare the devices to traditional nicotine replacement therapies, such as gum or patches.

To see how many e-cigarette users would cut down or quit smoking cigarettes without any encouragement, the researchers recruited 300 people between June 2010 and February 2011. All were current smokers who stated they had no intention of quitting in the near future. Each participant was then randomized into one of three groups.

One group received e-cigarettes along with cartridges containing 7.2 milligram (mg) of nicotine. Another group also received the devices and 7.2 mg nicotine cartridges, but later in the study they were switched to 5.4 mg nicotine cartridges. And a third group got e-cigarettes and cartridges containing only tobacco flavor but no nicotine.

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Each participant received enough supplies to last three months and went to regular checkups throughout the year.

At the end of the study, 13 percent of the group that first received the highest-dose nicotine cartridges was no longer smoking. That compared to 9 percent of those who were in the reduced-nicotine group and 4 percent in the group without nicotine.

Since there was no control group of smokers who got no e-cigarettes at all, it’s hard to know how many would have quit smoking on their own by the end of a year, experts noted.

Siegel, a professor at the Boston University School of Public Health, said he would expect about 2 percent of the participants to quit within a year if they weren’t involved in a study.

RELATED: SMOKERS SEE E-CIGS AS A WAY TO BREAK HABIT: SURVEY

However, Polosa’s team also found that between 9 and 12 percent of people in each of the nicotine-cartridge groups had reduced the amount they smoked by at least half.

“The study is very positive in that it shows if you smoke even a low- or medium-strength e-cigarette, you can get some increased quitting and decreased smoking,” Dr. Murray Laugesen, a tobacco and nicotine researcher who was not involved with the new study, told Reuters Health.

“It also has to be acknowledged that these are good results in people who had no intention of quitting,” said Laugesen, a public health medicine specialist at Health New Zealand Ltd in Christchurch. He is also involved in an e-cigarette clinical trial and hopes to present the results in September.

Siegel told Reuters Health that what’s attractive about e-cigarettes is they can not only provide the nicotine that smokers crave without other harmful substances, they allow people to mimic their traditional smoking behavior.

RELATED: E-CIGARETTES GAIN VISIBILITY, BUT EXPERTS DISAGREE ON SAFETY

Researchers said that’s one reason why e-cigarettes might turn out to be a better form of nicotine replacement therapy than patches and gums, but there’s no data yet to prove it.

“I think that’s why they… found the people who actually got no-nicotine electronic cigarettes had some sort of quitting behavior… But obviously the people who got the nicotine and the high dose of nicotine did the best. Clearly having the nicotine and device structure is ideal,” Siegel said.

But he cautioned that more research is needed – especially on the long-term safety of e-cigarettes and how the devices stack up against traditional smoking cessation methods.

“My advice to people is to try the traditional therapy first. But I think electronic cigarettes are for people who have tried and failed nicotine replacement therapy, which is, sadly, most people,” Siegel added.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/e-cigarette-study-hints-quit-aid-potential-article-1.1381914#ixzz2dIfKk2I3